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Surveillance and Screening During Disease-Free Survival

  • Richard Placide
  • Kai-Uwe Lewandrowski
  • Robert F. McLain
Part of the Current Clinical Oncology book series (CCO)

Abstract

After surgery for cancer of the spine, follow-up care to detect recurrence is an expected part of the overall postoperative care. Components of disease-free surveillance include periodic physical examinations, radiological studies, and blood work to follow or detect tumor markers. Establishing standards for routine follow-up may be difficult owing to the variability of cancers involving the spine (low-grade sarcomas, high-grade sarcomas, and metastatic disease) and the extent of involvement throughout the spine or body.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Clin Oncol Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Cancer Surveillance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press, Inc., Totowa, NJ 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Placide
    • 1
  • Kai-Uwe Lewandrowski
    • 2
  • Robert F. McLain
    • 3
  1. 1.West End Orthopaedic Clinic Inc.Chippenham Medical CenterRichmond
  2. 2.The Cleveland Clinic Spine InstituteThe Cleveland Clinic FoundationCleveland
  3. 3.Lerner College of Medicine and The Cleveland Clinic Spine Institute, Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryThe Cleveland Clinic FoundationCleveland

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