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Dopamine and Glutamate in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

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Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex condition, thought to have multiple subtypes lurking within a broad, behaviorally defined phenotype, making it difficult to identify specific biological causes of this syndrome. However, the evidence from studies conducted over the past decade suggests that dopamine (DA) plays a prominent role in the etiology and treatment of ADHD. Here we will start with consensus views that have emerged about ADHD at the behavioral, biological, and genetic levels of analysis. Then, we will summarize the evidence that links DA to ADHD.

Keywords

  • Stimulant Medication
  • Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry
  • DRD4 Gene
  • Child Psychol Psychiatry
  • DRD4 Genotype

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Swanson, J.M. et al. (2005). Dopamine and Glutamate in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. In: Schmidt, W.J., Reith, M.E.A. (eds) Dopamine and Glutamate in Psychiatric Disorders. Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-852-6_13

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