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Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Abstract

Historically and understandably, nutrition and dietary manipulation in the rheumatoid disease field has been highly controversial. Most of the early reports of benefit from dietary changes were anecdotal, and many of the early trials were poorly designed with results of doubtful credibility.

Keywords

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Synovial Fluid
  • Food Allergy
  • Dietary Therapy
  • Food Challenge

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Darlington, L.G. (2004). Rheumatoid Arthritis. In: Hughes, D.A., Darlington, L.G., Bendich, A. (eds) Diet and Human Immune Function. Nutrition and Health. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-652-2_14

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-652-2_14

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