Skip to main content

Cranberry Juice Effects on Health

  • Chapter
  • 515 Accesses

Part of the Nutrition and Health book series (NH)

Abstract

Cranberries (Vacciunium macrocapron) for millenia have been a part of the diet of North Americans and used for medicinal purposes in folk medicine (1). Although cranberries are most familiar to consumers in North America, close relatives of the cranberry are also consumed in Northern Europe and Asia. In North America and Europe, cranberries are primarily processed and consumed in the form of cranberry juices, cranberry juice cocktails, and cranberry fruit drinks, with the oldest cranberry juice recipe dating back to 1683 (1). Cranberries have only been cultivated for the last 150 yr; therefore, relative to grapes and other cultivated fruits, there is little genetic diversity (2). The typical annual crop size is approx 500 million pounds, with 60% being used directly in beverages, 35% being processed into sauces and concentrates that are mostly made into beverages, and 5% being consumed fresh (3). Cranberries are popular with consumers because of their bittertart taste, and because of their positive implication for health as a functional food, they are one of the first functional foods in America. As a functional food, cranberry juice is associated with protection from urinary tract infections (UTIs). Cranberry juice may also be useful for promoting cardiovascular health and inhibiting cancer development, and suggestions have also been made regarding cranberry applications for improving oral and gastric health.

Keywords

  • Urinary Tract Infection
  • Grape Juice
  • Hippuric Acid
  • Tomato Juice
  • Cranberry Juice

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-59259-415-3_4
  • Chapter length: 12 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   189.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-1-59259-415-3
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   249.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   249.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Henig YS, Leahy MM. Cranberry juice and urinary-tract health: science supports folklore. Nutrition 2000;16:684–687.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  2. Roper TR, Vorsa N. Cranberry: botany and horticulture. Horticult Rev 1997;21:215–249.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Zuo Y, Wang C, Zhan J. Separation, characterization, and quantification of benzoic and phenolic antioxidants in American cranberry fruit by GC-MS. J Agric Food Chem 2002;50:3789–3794.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  4. Dowling KJ, Roberts JA, Kaack MB. P-fimbriated Escherichia coli urinary tract infection: a clinical correlation. South Med J 1987;80:1533–1536.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  5. Foxman B, Barlow R, D’Arcy H, Gillespie B, Sobel JD. Urinary tract infection: self-reported incidence and associated costs. Ann Epidemiol 2000;10:509–515.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  6. Blatherwick ND. The specific role of foods in relation to the composition of urine. Arch Intern Med 1914;14:409–450.

    CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  7. Blatherwick ND, Long ML. Studies of urinary acidity—the increased acidity by eating prunes and cranberries. J Biol Chem 1923;57:815–818.

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  8. Fellers CR, Redmon BC, Parrott EM. Effect of cranberries on urinary acidity and blood alkali reserve. J Nutr 1933;6:455–463.

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  9. Bodel PI, Cotrain R, Kass EH. Cranberry juice and the antibacterial action of hippuric acid. J Lab Clin Med 1959;54:881–888.

    PubMed  CAS  Google Scholar 

  10. Kahn HD, Panareillo VA, Saeji J, Sampson JR, Schwarz E. Effect of cranberry juice on urine. J Am Diet Assoc 1967;52:251–254.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Sobota AE. Inhibition of bacterial adherence by cranberry juice: potential use for the treatment of urinary tract infections. J Urol 1984:131:1013–1016.

    PubMed  CAS  Google Scholar 

  12. Avorn J, Monane M, Gurwitz JH, Glynn RJ, Choodnovskiy I, Lipsitz LA. Reduction of bacteriuria and pyruria after ingestion of cranberry juice. JAMA 1994;271:751–754.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  13. Ikaheimo R, Siitonen A, Heiskanen T, et al. Recurrence of urinary tract infection in a priamry care setting: analysis of a 1-year follow-up of 179 women. Clin Infect Dis 1996;22:91–99.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  14. Kontiokari T, Sundquist K, Nuutinen M, Pokka T, Koskela M, Uhari M. Randomized trial of cranberrylingonberry juice and lactobacillus GG drink for the prevention of urinary tract infections in women. BMJ 2001;322:1571–1584.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  15. Vinson JA, Su X, Zubik L, Bose P. Phenol antioxidant quality in foods: fruits. J Agric Food Chem 2001;49:5315–5321.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  16. Ofek I, Goldhar J, Sharon N. Anti-Escherichia coli adhesion activity of cranberry and blueberry juices. Adv Exp Med Biol 1996;408:179–183.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  17. Howell AB. Cranberry proanthocyanidins and the maintenance of urinary tract health. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2002;42(Suppl):273–278.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  18. Howell AB, Vorsa N, Marderosian AD, Foo LY. Inhibition of the adherence of p-fimbriated E. coli to uropithelial cell surfaces by proanthocyanidin extracts from cranberries. N Engl J Med 1998;339: 1085–1086.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  19. Burger O, Ofek I, Tabak M, Weiss E, Sharon N, Neeman I. A high molecular weight constituent of cranberry juice inhibits Helicobacter pylori adhesion to human gastric mucus. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol 2000;22:1–7.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Weiss EI, Lev-Dor R, Kashamn Y, Goldhar J, Sharon N, Ofek I. Inhibiting interspecies coaggregation of plaque bacteria with a cranberry juice constituent. J Am Diet Assoc 1998;129:1719–1723.

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  21. Renaud S, De Lorgeril M. Wine, alcohol, platelets, and the French paradox for coronary heart disease. Lancet 1992;118:1184–1189.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Stein JH, Keevil JG, Wiebe DA, Aeschlimann S, Folts JD. Purple grape juice improves endothelial function and reduces the susceptibility of LDL cholesterol to oxidation in patients with coronary artery disease. Circulation 1999;100:1050–1055.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  23. Chou EJ, Keevil JG, Aeschlimann S, Wiebe DA, Folts JD, Stein JH. Effect of ingestion of purple grape juice on endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease. Am J Cardiol 2000;88:553–555.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  24. Maher MA, Mataczynski H, Stephaniak HM, Wilson T. Cranberry juice induces nitric oxide dependent vasodilation and transiently reduces blood pressure. J Med Foods 2000;3:141–147.

    CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  25. Flesch M, Schwarz A, Bohm, M. Effects of red wine and white wine on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of rat aorta and human coronary arteries. Am J Physiol 1998;275:H1183-H1190.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Demrow HS, Slane PR, Folts JD. Administration of wine and grape juice inhibits in vivo platelet activity and thrombosis in stenosed canine coronary arteries. Circulation 1995; 91:1182–1188.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  27. Freedman JE, Parker C 3rd, Li L, et al. Select flavonoids and whole juice from purple grapes inhibit platelet function and enhance nitric oxide release. Circulation 2001;103:2792–2798.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  28. Wilson T, Marley JC. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on platelet aggregation [abstract]. FASEB J 2001;15:A286.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Reed JD, Kreuger CG, Porter ML. Cranberry juice powder decreases low density lipoprotein cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic swine [abstract]. FASEB J 2001;15:54.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Wilson T, Porcari JP, Harbin D. Cranberry extract inhibits low density lipoprotein oxidation. Life Sci 1998;62:PL381-PL386.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  31. Wilson T, Porcari JP, Maher MA. Cranberry juice inhibits metal- and non-metal initiated oxidation of low density lipoprotein. J Nutra Funct Med Foods 1999;2:5–14.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  32. Wilson T, Zoeller WJ, Schaaf PJ, Maher MA. Cultivar and source dependent variation in the ability of cranberry juice to protect human LDL from oxidation in vitro [abstract]. FASEB J 2000;14:A269.

    Google Scholar 

  33. Wilson T, Mahoney L, Porcari JP, Maher MA. Polyphenolic content of cranberry juices [abstract]. FASEB J 1998;11:A561.

    Google Scholar 

  34. Pederson CB, Kyle J, Jenkinson AM, Gardner PT, McPhail DB, Duthie GG. Effects of blueberry and cranberry juice consumption on the plasma antioxidant capacity of healthy female volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr 2000;54:405–408.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  35. Frankel EN, Meyer AS. Antioxidants in grapes and grape juices and their potential health effects. Pharm Biol 1998;36(Suppl):14–20.

    CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  36. Frankel EN, Waterhouse AL, Teissedre PL. Principal phenolic phytochemicals in selected California wines and their antioxidant activity in inhibiting oxidation of low density lipoproteins. J Agric Food Chem 1995;43:890–894.

    CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  37. Wang SY, Stretch AW. Antioxidant capacity in cranberry is influenced by cultivar and storage temperature. J Agric Food Chem 2001;49:969–974.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  38. Bomser J, Madhavi BL, Singletary K, Smith MA. In vitro anticancer activity of fruit extracts from vaccinium species. Planta Med 1996;62:212–216.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  39. Bilyk A, Sapers GM. Varietal differences in the quercetin, kaempferol, and myrecitin contents of highbush blueberry, cranberry, and thornless blackberry fruits. J Agric Food Chem 1986;34:585–588.

    CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

  40. Weisburger JH. Mechanisms of action of antioxidants as exemplified in vegetables, tomatoes and tea. Food Chem Toxicol 1999;37:943–948.

    PubMed  CrossRef  CAS  Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2004 Springer Science+Business Media New York

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Wilson, T. (2004). Cranberry Juice Effects on Health. In: Wilson, T., Temple, N.J. (eds) Beverages in Nutrition and Health. Nutrition and Health. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-415-3_4

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-415-3_4

  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, Totowa, NJ

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-61737-402-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-59259-415-3

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive