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Optimizing Nutrition for Exercise and Sport

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Nutritional Health

Part of the book series: Nutrition ◊ and ◊ Health ((NH))

Abstract

The primary factors that affect exercise performance capacity include an individual’s genetic endowment, the quality of training, and the effectiveness of coaching (see Fig. 1). Beyond these factors, nutrition plays a critical role in optimizing performance capacity. In order for an athlete to perform well, their training and diet must be optimal. If an athlete does not train enough or has an inadequate diet, their performance may be decreased (1). On the other hand, if an athlete trains too much without a sufficient diet, they maybe susceptible to become overtrained (see Fig. 2).

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Leutholtz, B., Kreider, R.B. (2001). Optimizing Nutrition for Exercise and Sport. In: Wilson, T., Temple, N.J. (eds) Nutritional Health. Nutrition ◊ and ◊ Health. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-226-5_14

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-226-5_14

  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, Totowa, NJ

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