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A Potent Nonpeptidic Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitor

Discovery of BAY 12-9566
  • G. Clemens
  • B. Hibner
  • R. Humphrey
  • H. Kluender
  • S. Wilhelm
Chapter
Part of the Cancer Drug Discovery and Development book series (CDD&D)

Abstract

Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are comprised of a zinc-binding functional group which targets the inhibitor to the catalytic zinc within the active site of the enzyme, and a peptidomimetic portion which increases the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme active site, thereby mimicking the natural peptide substrate. The majority of first generation inhibitors of MMPs were first described in the literature in the late 1980s. These matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs) were designed as inhibitors of fibroblast interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) and consisted of a hydroxamic acid as the zinc-binding functional group and a LeuLeuPhe or LeuPhe as a mimetic of the preferred substrate of MMP-1 (Fig. 1) (1). These early compounds were often broad-spectrum MMPIs, with potent inhibitory activity against fibroblast collagenase, stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), and the gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). As peptides, they suffered from low bioavailability and rapid metabolism, and as hydroxamic acids they were potentially mutagenic.

Keywords

Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Hydroxamic Acid Human Gingival Fibroblast Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitor Antimetastatic Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Clemens
  • B. Hibner
  • R. Humphrey
  • H. Kluender
  • S. Wilhelm

There are no affiliations available

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