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Huntington’s Disease Case Study

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Abstract

Huntington’s disease is a devastating and complex disease that deeply impacts patients and their families. Changes in basic health, cognition, and personality tax patients, families, and caregivers. A collaborative team approach involving neuropsychologists and medical providers offering comprehensive evaluation and treatment in collaboration with patients and families enhances care of those with Huntington’s disease (HD).

Keywords

  • Huntington’s disease
  • Neuropsychological assessment
  • Prodromal signs/symptoms

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-8722-1_19
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Sanders, K.M., Burdick, D.J. (2019). Huntington’s Disease Case Study. In: Sanders, K. (eds) Physician's Field Guide to Neuropsychology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8722-1_19

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8722-1_19

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