Advertisement

Primary Succession on the Mount St. Helens Volcano: Ground Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Community Assembly and Species Turnover, 1980–2010

  • Robert R. Parmenter
  • Charles M. Crisafulli
  • Tara E. Blackman
  • Cheryl A. Parmenter
  • Gary L. Parsons
  • Danny Shpeley
  • James A. MacMahon
Chapter

Abstract

We documented the recruitment, loss, and turnover of 51 species of ground beetles during 30 years of post-eruption primary succession on the Pumice Plain near Spirit Lake at Mount St. Helens. We observed high species turnover, with many species colonizing, expanding their populations, and then declining to local extinction over periods of 10–15 years. Species patterns were related to soil and vegetation development, accrual of prey species, and natural-history characteristics of the resident species (e.g., trophic role, dispersal traits (flight/ambulatory), microhabitat preferences, seasonal/daily activity times). Overall, species successional turnover rates were substantially higher than plants and vertebrate wildlife species.

Keywords

Disturbance Insect Plant-animal interactions Predator-prey Primary succession Trophic structure 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Support for the field sampling and laboratory analyses during this study was provided by the National Science Foundation (BSR 84-0721, DBI-9820318 and LTREB Program DEB-0614538); the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station; the Museum of Southwestern Biology at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; the Department of Entomology, Michigan State University; the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton; and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan. We greatly appreciate the comments by three anonymous reviewers that led to improvements in this chapter. We thank the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument for access to our study sites. We also thank all the students and researchers who have participated in the project over the past 30 years, and we are grateful for the insights and inspiration provided by the late Professor John S. Edwards, University of Washington.

References

  1. Adams, A.B., and S. Leffler. 1986. Insect recolonization of the northwest sector of the Mount St. Helens blast zone. In Mount St. Helens: Five years later, ed. S.A.K. Keller, 307–324. Spokane: Eastern Washington University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Anderson, K.J. 2007. Temporal patterns in rates of community change during succession. American Naturalist 169: 780–793.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ball, G.E. 2001. Trachypachidae C.G. Thomson, 1857. In American beetles, volume 1. Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga, Polyphaga: Staphyliniformia, ed. R.H. Arnett Jr. and M.C. Thomas, 144–146. New York: CRC Press.Google Scholar
  4. Ball, G.E., and Y. Bousquet. 2001. Carabidae Latreille, 1810. In American beetles, volume 1. Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga, Polyphaga: Staphyliniformia, ed. R.H. Arnett Jr. and M.C. Thomas, 32–132. New York: CRC Press.Google Scholar
  5. Banks, N.G., and R.P. Hoblitt. 1981. Summary of temperature studies of 1980 deposits. In The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Professional Paper 1250, ed. P.W. Lipman and D.R. Mullineaux, 295–313. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey.Google Scholar
  6. Bishop, J.G. 2002. Early primary succession on Mount St. Helens: Impact of insect herbivores on colonizing lupines. Ecology 83: 191–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bishop, J.G., W.F. Fagan, J.D. Schade, and C.M. Crisafulli. 2005. Causes and consequences of herbivory on prairie lupine (Lupinus lepidus) in early primary succession. In Ecological responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, ed. V.H. Dale, F.J. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, 151–161. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bishop, J.G., N.B. O’Hara, J.H. Titus, J.L. Apple, R.A. Gill, and L. Wynn. 2010. N-P co-limitation of primary production and response of arthropods to N and P in early primary succession on Mount St. Helens volcano. PLoS ONE 5 (10): e13598. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013598.
  9. Blanchet, F.G., J.A.C. Bergeron, J.R. Spence, and H. Fangliang. 2013. Landscape effects of disturbance, habitat heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation for a ground beetle (Carabidae) assemblage in mature boreal forest. Ecography 36: 636–647.Google Scholar
  10. Cole, L.J., S. Brocklehurst, D.A. Elston, and D.I. McCracken. 2012. Riparian field margins: Can they enhance the functional structure of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in intensively managed grassland landscapes? Journal of Applied Ecology 49: 1384–1395.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Crisafulli, C.M., J.A. MacMahon, and R.R. Parmenter. 2005a. Small-mammal survival and colonization on the Mount St. Helens volcano: 1980–2002. In Ecological responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, ed. V.H. Dale, F.J. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, 199–218. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Crisafulli, C.M., L.S. Trippe, C.P. Hawkins, and J.A. MacMahon. 2005b. Amphibian responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. In Ecological responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, ed. V.H. Dale, F.J. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, 183–197. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Dale, V.H., D.R. Campbell, W.M. Adams, C.M. Crisafulli, V.I. Dains, P.M. Frenzen, and R.F. Holland. 2005a. Plant succession on the Mount St. Helens debris-avalanche deposit. In Ecological responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, ed. V.H. Dale, F.J. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, 59–73. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Dale, V.H., F.J. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, eds. 2005b. Ecological responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  15. Dennis, P., M.R. Young, C.L. Howard, and I.J. Gordon. 1997. The response of epigeal beetles (Col.: Carabidae, Staphylinidae) to varied grazing regimes on upland Nardus stricta grasslands. Journal of Applied Ecology 34: 433–443.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Dennis, P., M.R. Young, and I.J. Gordon. 1998. Distribution and abundance of small insects and arachnids in relation to structural heterogeneity of grazed, indigenous grasslands. Ecological Entomology 23: 253–264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Dunger, W. 1989. The return of soil fauna to coal mined areas in the German Democratic Republic. In Animals in primary succession, ed. J.D. Majer, 307–337. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Edwards, J.S. 1986a. Arthropods as pioneers: recolonization of the blast zone on Mount St. Helens. Northwest Environmental Journal 2: 263–273.Google Scholar
  19. ———. 1986b. Derelicts of dispersal: Arthropod fallout on Pacific Northwest volcanoes. In Insect flight: Dispersal and migration, ed. W. Danthanarayana, 196–203. New York: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Edwards, J.S., and L.M. Schwartz. 1981. Mount St. Helens ash: A natural insecticide. Canadian Journal of Zoology 59: 714–715.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Edwards, J.S., and P.M. Sugg. 1993. Arthropod fallout as a resource in the recolonization of Mount St. Helens. Ecology 74: 954–958.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. ———. 2005. Arthropods as pioneers in the regeneration of life on the pyroclastic-flow deposits of Mount St. Helens. In Ecological recovery of Mount St. Helens after the 1980 eruption, ed. V.H. Dale, F. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, 127–138. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Edwards, J.S., R.L. Crawford, P.M. Sugg, and M.A. Peterson. 1986. Arthropod recolonization in the blast zone of Mount St. Helens. In Mount St. Helens: Five years later, ed. S.A.K. Keller, 329–333. Spokane: Eastern Washington University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Egler, F.E. 1954. Vegetation science concepts. I. Initial floristics composition. A factor in old-field vegetation development. Vegetatio 4: 412–417.Google Scholar
  25. Elia, M., R. Lafortezza, E. Tarasco, G. Colangelo, and G. Sanesi. 2012. The spatial and temporal effects of fire on insect abundance in Mediterranean forest ecosystems. Forest Ecology and Management 263: 262–267.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Elizalde, L. 2014. Volcanism and arthropods: A review. Ecología Austral 24: 3–16.Google Scholar
  27. Erwin, T.L. 2007. A treatise on the western hemisphere Caraboidea (Coleoptera). Their classification, distributions, and ways of life, Trachypachidae, Carabidae—Nebriiformes 1. Vol. 1. Sofia: Pensoft Publishers.Google Scholar
  28. Fernández-Arhex, V., M. Buteler, M.E. Amadio, A. Enriquez, T. Stadler, G. Becker, and O. Bruzzone. 2013. The effects of volcanic ash from Puyehue–Caulle range eruption on the survival of Dichroplus vittigerum (Orthoptera: Acrididae). Florida Entomologist 96: 286–288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Foxworthy, B.L., and M. Hill. 1982. Volcanic eruptions of 1980 at Mount St. Helens: The first 100 days, Professional Paper 1249. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey.Google Scholar
  30. Gandhi, K.J.K., D.W. Gilmore, S.A. Katovich, W.J. Mattson, J.C. Zasada, and S.J. Seybold. 2008. Catastrophic windstorm and fuel-reduction treatments alter ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in a North American sub-boreal forest. Forest Ecology and Management 256: 1104–1123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Hatch, M.H. 1953. The beetles of the Pacific Northwest. Part I. Introduction and adephaga. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
  32. Hodkinson, I.D., N.R. Webb, and S.J. Coulson. 2002. Primary community assembly on land – The missing stages: Why are the heterotrophic organisms always there first? Journal of Ecology 90: 569–577.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Hoffer, J.M., and R.L. Hoffer. 1986. Chemical composition of the May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens tephra and the underlying soil: Changes from July 1980 to May 1981. In Mount St. Helens: Five years later, ed. S.A.K. Keller, 108–111. Spokane: Eastern Washington University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Hoffer, J.M., R.L. Hoffer, and W.M. Shannon. 1982. Preliminary analyses of the composition and texture May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens tephra. In Mount St. Helens: One year later, ed. S.A.C. Keller, 21–25. Spokane: Eastern Washington University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Iglay, R.B., D.A. Miller, B.D. Leopold, and G. Wang. 2012. Carabid beetle response to prescribed fire and herbicide in intensively managed, mid-rotation pine stands in Mississippi. Forest Ecology and Management 281: 41–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Jaccard, P. 1908. Nouvelles recherches sur la distribution florale. Bulletin de la Societé Vandoise de Science Naturelle 44: 223–270.Google Scholar
  37. Larochelle, A., and M.-C. Larivière. 2003. A natural history of the ground-beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) of America North of Mexico. Sofia: Pensoft Publishers.Google Scholar
  38. MacMahon, J.A., R.R. Parmenter, K.A. Johnson, and C.M. Crisafulli. 1989. Small mammal recolonization on the Mount St. Helens volcano: 1980–1987. American Midland Naturalist 122: 365–387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Martinson, H.M., and M.J. Raupp. 2013. A meta-analysis of the effects of urbanization on ground beetle communities. Ecosphere 4 (5): 60. https://doi.org/10.1890/ES12-00262.1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Masciocchi, M., A.J. Pereira, M.V. Lantschner, and J.C. Corley. 2012. Of volcanoes and insects: the impact of the Puyehue–Cordón Caulle ash fall on populations of invasive social wasps, Vespula spp. Ecological Research 28: 199–205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Meijer, J. 1989. Sixteen years of fauna invasion and succession in the Lauwerszeepolder. In Animals in primary succession, ed. J.D. Majer, 339–369. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  42. Niemelä, J., M. Koivula, and D.J. Kotze. 2007. The effects of forestry on carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in boreal forests. Journal of Insect Conservation 11: 5–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Parmenter, R.R., and J.A. MacMahon. 1987. Early successional patterns of arthropod recolonization on reclaimed strip mines in southwestern Wyoming: The ground-dwelling beetle fauna (Coleoptera). Environmental Entomology 16: 168–177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Parmenter, R.R., C.M. Crisafulli, N. Korbe, G. Parsons, M. Edgar, and J.A. MacMahon. 2005. Post-eruption arthropod succession on the Mount St. Helens volcano: The ground-dwelling beetle fauna (Coleoptera). In Ecological recovery of Mount St. Helens after the 1980 eruption, ed. V.H. Dale, F. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, 139–150. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Parsons, G.L., G. Cassis, A.R. Moldenke, J.D. Lattin, N.H. Anderson, J.C. Miller, P. Hammond, and T.D. Schowalter. 1991. Invertebrates of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Western Cascade Range, Oregon. V: An annotated list of insects and other arthropods, General Technical Report PNW-GTR-290. Portland: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station.Google Scholar
  46. Pearce, J.L., and L.A. Venier. 2006. The use of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and spiders (Araneae) as bioindicators of sustainable forest management: A review. Ecological Indicators 6: 780–793.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Pearson, D.L., C.B. Knisley, and C.J. Kazilek. 2006. A field guide to the tiger beetles of the United States and Canada. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  48. Reynolds, G.D., and L.C. Bliss. 1986. Microenvironmental investigations of tephra covered surfaces at Mount St. Helens. In Mount St. Helens: Five years later, ed. S.A.K. Keller, 147–152. Spokane: Eastern Washington University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Rusch, A., R. Bommarco, P. Chiverton, S. Oberg, H. Wallin, S. Wiktelius, and B. Ekbom. 2013. Response of ground beetle (Coleoptera, Carabidae) communities to changes in agricultural policies in Sweden over two decades. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 176: 63–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Sasal, Y., E. Raffaele, and A.G. Farji-Brener. 2010. Succession of ground dwelling beetle assemblages after fire in three habitat types in the Andean forest of NW Patagonia, Argentina. Journal of Insect Science 10: 1–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Schirmel, J., and S. Buchholz. 2011. Response of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and spiders (Araneae) to coastal heathland succession. Biodiversity and Conservation 20: 1469–1482.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Sugg, P.M. 1989. Arthropod populations at Mount St. Helens: survival and revival. Doctoral dissertation. Seattle: University of Washington.Google Scholar
  53. Sugg, P.M., and J.S. Edwards. 1998. Pioneer aeolian community development on pyroclastic flows after the eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, U.S.A. Arctic and Alpine Research 30: 400–407.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Swanson, F.J., and J.J. Major. 2005. Physical events, environments, and geological-ecological interactions at Mount St. Helens: March 1980–2004. In Ecological recovery of Mount St. Helens after the 1980 eruption, ed. V.H. Dale, F. Swanson, and C.M. Crisafulli, 27–44. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Wagner, R., and R.B. Walker. 1986. Mineral nutrient availability in some Mount St. Helens surface samples. In Mount St. Helens: Five years later, ed. S.A.K. Keller, 153–162. Spokane: Eastern Washington University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert R. Parmenter
    • 1
    • 2
  • Charles M. Crisafulli
    • 3
  • Tara E. Blackman
    • 3
  • Cheryl A. Parmenter
    • 2
  • Gary L. Parsons
    • 4
  • Danny Shpeley
    • 5
  • James A. MacMahon
    • 6
  1. 1.National Park Service, Valles Caldera National PreserveJemez SpringsUSA
  2. 2.Museum of Southwestern Biology, Department of BiologyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  3. 3.U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research StationMount St. Helens National Volcanic MonumentAmboyUSA
  4. 4.Department of Entomology, A.J. Cook Arthropod Research CollectionMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  5. 5.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  6. 6.Department of Biology and the Ecology CenterUtah State UniversityLoganUSA

Personalised recommendations