Ecological Responses to the 1980 Eruption of Mount St. Helens: Key Lessons and Remaining Questions

Chapter

Abstract

This book synthesizes understanding of ecological change in the complex and changing environment around the Mount St. Helens volcano, which is unique in the study of volcanic eruptions and subsequent ecological recovery. The variety and large spatial extent of the primary disturbance and subsequent ecological and geophysical processes that continue to unfold create rich opportunities for addressing numerous ecological questions at the volcano. Details of the 1980 eruption along with key concepts and lessons learned over the first decades of study at Mount St. Helens are presented, and key findings are discussed.

Keywords

Disturbance Volcanic disturbance processes Disturbance gradient Ecosystems Survival Colonization Succession Community assembly Disturbance mechanisms 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We appreciate the insightful review of an earlier version of the chapter by Fred Swanson. We thank Kathryn Ronnenberg for generating final figures and tables and for copy editing the text. Part of the work by VHD was supported by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Support for CMC has been provided by the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station and the National Science Foundation (LTREB Program DEB-0614538). The Gifford Pinchot National Forest granted access to study sites and provided logistical support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Ecology & Evolutionary BiologyThe University of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research StationMount St. Helens National Volcanic MonumentAmboyUSA

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