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Hypertension in Pregnancy

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Abstract

Hypertensive disorders complicate up to 10 % of pregnancies, and are a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy include four categories: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and superimposed preeclampsia. The diagnosis and management of hypertension in pregnancy requires a special approach with attention toward the maternal and fetal effects of both the disease and the treatment. This chapter reviews the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Keywords

  • Pregnancy
  • Preeclampsia
  • Gestational hypertension
  • Preterm birth
  • Intrauterine growth restriction

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Fig. 6.1

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Maynard, S. (2016). Hypertension in Pregnancy. In: Singh, A., Agarwal, R. (eds) Core Concepts in Hypertension in Kidney Disease. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6436-9_6

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