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Transhumanism: The Growing Worldview

Abstract

Transhumanism established a set of values conveying emerging technology and humanity in three essential areas: critical thinking, visionary narratives, and technological innovation. The philosophy established values, goals, and principles that synthesize epistemological and metaphysical views. Its roots stem from historical systems of thinking that form social and cultural attitudes. For example, the diversity of global culture, human rights, the economics of techno production and supply, the ecology of well-being, the development of human enhancement interventions, radical life extension, and the politics of laws and policy-making. This synergistic approach brought greater insight into assessing the challenges and conflicts we face and how to build practical and applied solutions. The expression of transhumanist thinking is practical optimism.

Keywords

  • Critical Thinking
  • Life Extension
  • Human Enhancement
  • Historical System
  • Metaphysical View

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Vita-More, N. (2016). Transhumanism: The Growing Worldview. In: Lee, N. (eds) Google It. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6415-4_27

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6415-4_27

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