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Characterizing Categorical Map Patterns Using Neutral Landscape Models

Abstract

Spatial patterns of landscapes are the result of numerous biotic, abiotic, and anthropogenic processes, and every landscape is in some way unique. Neutral landscape models—models that lack the explicit consideration of the particular processes generating landscape pattern (Gardner et al., Landsc Ecol 1:19–28, 1987; Gardner and Engelhardt, Perspect Plant Ecol Evol Syst 9:211–228, 2008)—have proven to be a helpful first step in characterizing pattern in the absence of specific ecological processes and thus serve as a null hypothesis, or baseline, for comparison with actual landscapes. Neutral landscape models have led to new understanding about habitat connectivity thresholds and the influence of landscape composition on spatial configuration (see Gardner and Urban, Landsc Ecol 22:15–29, 2007 for a review), and they offer a practical means of generating multiple landscape maps with similar statistical properties. This lab is designed to.

Keywords

  • Neutral Landscape Models (NLMs)
  • Actual Landscape
  • Specific Ecological Processes
  • Landsc Ecol
  • Landscape Pattern

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Figure 6.1
Figure 6.2

References and Recommended Readings

Note: An asterisk preceding the entry indicates that it is a suggested reading.

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Correspondence to Robert H. Gardner .

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Gardner, R.H. (2017). Characterizing Categorical Map Patterns Using Neutral Landscape Models. In: Gergel, S., Turner, M. (eds) Learning Landscape Ecology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6374-4_6

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