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Scale Detection Using Semivariograms and Autocorrelograms

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Abstract

The evolution and ecology of all organisms are contingent on the complex variation seen in nature. Landscape ecology differs from most other branches of ecology in that it explicitly involves spatial variation. Therefore, one of the goals of landscape ecology is to describe spatial variation. The purpose of this exercise is to.

Keywords

  • Home Range
  • Spatial Dependence
  • Landscape Ecology
  • Home Range Size
  • Simple Polygon

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Recommended Readings

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Acknowledgements

We thank Steven Thompson, Sam Fuhlendorf, Anne Cross, Sophonia Roe, Marie-Josée Fortin, and four anonymous reviewers for comments on earlier versions. We especially thank Sam Fuhlendorf for allowing the use of his data, and José Ramón Arévalo for collecting new data for the lab.

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Correspondence to Michael W. Palmer .

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Palmer, M.W., McGlinn, D.J. (2017). Scale Detection Using Semivariograms and Autocorrelograms. In: Gergel, S., Turner, M. (eds) Learning Landscape Ecology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6374-4_5

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