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Introduction to Remote Sensing

Abstract

Remote sensing is the science of gathering spatial information about the Earth’s surface (as well as the oceans and atmosphere) from a distance, using either handheld, aircraft, or satellite sensors. Such data are routinely used in landscape ecology to map, monitor, and manage landscapes. It is important to understand and fully appreciate the different types of electromagnetic radiation used to create geodata derived from remote sensing systems, the spectral and spatial properties of natural and manufactured materials, as well as the characteristics of airborne and satellite sensor systems. Understanding these fundamental aspects of remote sensing will assist landscape ecologists in understanding and distinguishing the diversity and heterogeneity of land cover types in their study regions and better assess how landscapes might have changed over time. This chapter will enable students to.

Keywords

  • Land Cover
  • Land Cover Change
  • Land Cover Type
  • Satellite Sensor
  • Coarse Spatial Resolution

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Recommended Readings

NOTE: An asterisk preceding the entry indicates that it is a suggested reading.

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Correspondence to Nicholas C. Coops .

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Coops, N.C., Tooke, T.R. (2017). Introduction to Remote Sensing. In: Gergel, S., Turner, M. (eds) Learning Landscape Ecology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6374-4_1

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