Mindfulness Matters in the Classroom: The Effects of Mindfulness Training on Brain Development and Behavior in Children and Adolescents

Chapter
Part of the Mindfulness in Behavioral Health book series (MIBH)

Abstract

This chapter reviews evidence from developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience on the effects of mindfulness training in children and adolescents. It is argued that mindfulness practices can be integrated into all classroom levels from preschool to high school, and that doing so has the potential to improve students’ brain functioning and lead to changes in brain structure that facilitate academic success. In particular, it is argued that mindfulness practice improves various aspects of self-regulation that are central to academic achievement. Directions for future research and suggestions for educators who wish to introduce mindfulness practices to their students are discussed.

Keywords

Mindfulness Cognitive neuroscience Education Children Adolescents Executive function Emotion-regulation Self-control 

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© Springer-Verlag New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Metropolitan State University of DenverDenverUSA

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