Anthropogenic Noise and Physiological Stress in Wildlife

  • Jennifer B. Tennessen
  • Susan E. Parks
  • Tracy L. Langkilde
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-2981-8_142

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 875)
Cite this paper as:
Tennessen J.B., Parks S.E., Langkilde T.L. (2016) Anthropogenic Noise and Physiological Stress in Wildlife. In: Popper A., Hawkins A. (eds) The Effects of Noise on Aquatic Life II. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol 875. Springer, New York, NY

Abstract

The ecological impacts of increasing levels of anthropogenic noise in marine and freshwater systems are of growing public interest. Recent emphasis on the physiological approaches to identifying the impacts of noise has led to increased recognition that anthropogenic noise is an environmental stressor. We briefly review the research on noise-induced physiological stress. Additionally, we summarize findings from a controlled playback experiment that explored the relationship between traffic noise and physiological stress in anurans (frogs and toads), an aquatic group that relies on acoustic communication for survival and reproduction.

Keywords

Noise Stress Corticosterone Glucocorticoid Frog 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer B. Tennessen
    • 1
  • Susan E. Parks
    • 2
  • Tracy L. Langkilde
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyThe Pennsylvania State UniversityState CollegeUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologySyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA

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