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Abstract

In this chapter, the basic principles and fundamentals of practicing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are discussed. The general structure of treatment is outlined and examples from sessions in each phase of treatment are provided. Initially, emphasis is placed on assessment, case conceptualization and treatment planning. Psychoeducation and goal setting are substantial parts of the orientation to CBT treatment. Later in treatment the focus shifts toward relapse prevention and booster sessions. The structure of individual sessions is also discussed with an emphasis on agenda setting, homework review/practice, teaching of new skills, and providing summary/feedback.

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Correspondence to Amanda W. Calkins Ph.D. .

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Calkins, A.W., Park, J.M., Wilhelm, S., E. Sprich, S. (2016). Basic Principles and Practice of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. In: Petersen, T., E. Sprich, S., Wilhelm, S. (eds) The Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Current Clinical Psychiatry. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2605-3_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2605-3_2

  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4939-2604-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4939-2605-3

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