Routing in WSNs for Space Application

Abstract

Wireless Sensors Networks are indispensable for applications whereby data needs to be sensed and transmitted from unfriendly terrains e.g., planets' surfaces.

The inherent ad-hoc nature of WSNs, whereby no topology can be defined in advance, imposes challenges to Routing. Sensor nodes have to detect each other and build an ad-hoc topology with specific gateways (e.g., sinks) that forward data to the control plane.

In this chapter, we present a deployment topology for WSNs in space applications, and delineate the challenges towards an optimal routing protocol that accounts basically for energy efficiency, self-organization, self-adaptation, and the use of multiple gateways. The latter disseminate data towards the control plane. In this context different WSNs routing protocols are surveyed and relevant trade-offs are presented and discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Science and Engineering, Alakhawayn University in IfraneIfraneMorocco
  2. 2.University of Houston, College of TechnologyHoustonUSA

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