Self-Regulatory Strength and Mindfulness

Abstract

The authors review evidence for the strength model of self-regulation (self-control), and discuss relations between mindfulness and self-regulation. The strength model of self-control suggests that exerting self-control may consume some limited resource and reduce the amount of strength available for subsequent self-control tasks. Another key feature of the strength model of self-control suggests that regular exercise can, over time, increase the strength or ability of self-control. In this way, self-control is said to resemble a muscle. Mindfulness and self-regulation appear to have some features in common. Increased mindfulness and increased self-regulatory ability both offer substantial benefits for living a healthy and successful life across several domains. Furthermore, exercises used to increase mindfulness are similar to exercises used to increase self-control. It seems likely, then, that mindfulness and self-control ability have a bidirectional relationship.

Keywords

Ego depletion Mindfulness Self-control Self-control, training of Self-regulation Self-regulation, strength model 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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