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Relaxation Techniques

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Substance Abuse

Abstract

Relaxation techniques have been around as long as there has been stress in people’s lives. When stressful situations present themselves whether one takes deep breaths to relax, meditates, or imagines a pleasant place or experience, these methods have been in existence since the beginning of time. Although these techniques, or training for relaxation, have been in existence it has only been recently that the western medical community has been accepting them. Now that the greater medical community has gained acceptance of these relaxation techniques, many practitioners find it difficult to understand the utility and/or how to incorporate these methods into treatment plans. This chapter will help educate and guide medical practitioners about relaxation techniques and how they can be implemented in one’s treatment plans and goals.

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Correspondence to Kareem Hubbard M.D. .

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Hubbard, K., Falco, F.J.E. (2015). Relaxation Techniques. In: Kaye, A., Vadivelu, N., Urman, R. (eds) Substance Abuse. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1951-2_26

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1951-2_26

  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4939-1950-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4939-1951-2

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