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Hundred Years of Intelligence Testing: Moving from Traditional IQ to Second-Generation Intelligence Tests

  • Jack A. Naglieri
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an historical perspective on intelligence and IQ testing from 1917 to present day. Traditional IQ tests are compared to second generation measures on several important dimensions including profiles of test scores, fairness to minority groups, and relevance to academic interventions. The PASS neurocognitive theory of intelligence as measured by the Cognitive Assessment System (First and Second Editions) is described as having the strongest research base and the most viable approach.

Keywords

Intelligence IQ Wechsler Planning Attention Simultaneous Successive (PASS) theory of intelligence Race and ethnic differences 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of VirginiaCentrevilleUSA

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