Neuro-Ophthalmologic Evaluation of the Orbit

Chapter

Abstract

Diseases of the orbit present with typical orbital localizing findings including proptosis, lid findings (e.g., edema, retraction, ptosis), visual loss (e.g., optic neuropathy), external signs (e.g., palpable mass), or restrictive or paretic ophthalmoplegia. The clinician dealing with orbital disease should be aware, however, that neuro-ophthalmic disease can coexist with orbital disorders; that orbital findings may be the presenting signs of systemic or neurological conditions; and that certain key portions of the neuro-ophthalmic exam should be performed in selected cases of orbital disease. This chapter discusses the major neuro-ophthalmologic features of orbital disease and the common neuro-ophthalmic pathology of the orbit that may mimic tumors. The orbital tumors are not discussed in detail; instead a review of the tumors of the optic nerve with special emphasis on optic nerve glioma and meningioma is included.

Keywords

Meningitis Cataract Neuroblastoma Hydrocephalus Gadolinium 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Ophthalmology, Methodist Eye AssociatesHouston Methodist HospitalHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Neurology and NeurosurgeryWeill Cornell Medical College of Cornell UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Center for Biomedical EngineeringThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA
  4. 4.Department of OphthalmologyThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA

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