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Spinal Cord Stimulation

  • Kliment Gatzinsky
Chapter

Abstract

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is the most commonly used invasive neuromodulation technique for chronic pain. It is a spin-off of the gate control theory, and is a nondestructive and reversible intervention, the beneficial effects of which may persist for many years. The main indications are neuropathic pain, as seen in patients with failed back surgery syndrome with persisting radiating leg pain, and painful ischemic disorders, such as refractory angina pectoris. Multidisciplinary clinical evaluation plays a fundamental role in patient selection and the implantation procedure is well tolerated by the patients. SCS is associated with exceedingly few serious complications, the existing adverse effects mostly being device related and readily manageable. There is growing evidence-based support for the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of SCS for several painful conditions. Early treatment provides the best long-term results. The technical refinements that have been introduced during the last few years are continuing and have improved the outcome of the therapy. For this reason, SCS merits to be considered at an earlier stage in the treatment ladder for painful neuropathic and ischemic disorders. It may be tried before drugs known to have troublesome side effects, such as high-dose opioids.

Keywords

Neuropathic Pain Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Spinal Cord Stimulation Painful Diabetic Neuropathy Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgerySahlgrenska University HospitalGothenburgSweden

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