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Story Sciencing and Analyzing the Silent Narrative Between Words: Counseling Research from an Indigenous Perspective

Part of the International and Cultural Psychology book series (ICUP)

Abstract

Community research has gone through an evolutionary process that has reached the sacred altar of community-based participatory research (CBPR). We contend that CBPR has not adequately reached the goal of transformative research in Indigenous communities because control of most research is maintained by academic institutions at the mercy of funding sources. Community-based research relies heavily on qualitative methods that continue to rely on content analysis. We propose that there may be a different approach to community-based research by relying on Indigenous methodologies that can best be described by the metaphor of story science, which has as its lineage Indigenous oral tradition based on Indigenous epistemology.

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Correspondence to Eduardo Duran .

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Duran, E., Firehammer, J. (2015). Story Sciencing and Analyzing the Silent Narrative Between Words: Counseling Research from an Indigenous Perspective. In: Goodman, R., Gorski, P. (eds) Decolonizing “Multicultural” Counseling through Social Justice. International and Cultural Psychology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1283-4_7

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