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A Contemporary Interpersonal Model of Borderline Personality Development

  • Christopher J. Hopwood
  • Nick Schade
  • Aaron L. Pincus
Chapter

Abstract

Interpersonal theory focuses on interpersonal situations as the primary lens through which to understand personality processes, personality pathology, and psychotherapy. In this chapter we apply this theoretical perspective to the issue of borderline personality development. We begin by reviewing research on the interpersonal context and correlates of borderline personality development and expression. We next outline the major principles and constructs of contemporary interpersonal theory. We conclude by presenting an interpersonal formulation of a borderline patient, with an emphasis on developmental dynamics.

Keywords

Borderline Personality Disorder Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Patient Interpersonal Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. Hopwood
    • 1
  • Nick Schade
    • 1
  • Aaron L. Pincus
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.The Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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