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Transition from High School to Adulthood for Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Chapter

Abstract

Individuals with ASD do not currently experience the autonomy or independence expected of youth transitioning to adulthood. On the contrary, individuals with ASD continue to be dependent on their families for providing basic needs, financial support, housing, day supervision and support, and companionship. Research has showed that individuals with ASD had poorer outcomes in employment and post-secondary education when compared with the other disability groups. While these reported outcomes portray a bleak picture, there is evidence that individuals with ASD can learn to live, work, and become contributing members of their communities. Thus, it is important to understand how the characteristics of ASD affect the adolescent and the critical components of transition educational programs that result in better outcomes for individuals with ASD. In this chapter, we will review the impact of ASD on the adolescent, specifically as it relates to achieving better outcomes upon transition from high school to higher education and work. Additionally, we will discuss transition to independence in community integration and living as well as collaboration with adult services agencies to provide the necessary supports and services to ensure better outcomes for individuals with ASD.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Adult Service Functional Skill Transition Team Dual Enrollment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Rehabilitation Research and Training CenterVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  2. 2.VCU Autism Center for ExcellenceVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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