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The Challenge of Automated Compounding

Part of the AAPS Advances in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Series book series (AAPS,volume 11)

Abstract

In an ideal world, doses of medicines would be tailored for the specific patient with the specific condition. If combinations are indicated, preferably, all drugs would be administered in one oral dosage form once or twice daily and the taste of the drugs would be concealed. The dosage form would resemble something children are used to intake. We are not there, but we might get there some day.

For now, microencapsulation seems to be one path to conceal the taste of drugs, to prevent drug–drug and drug–excipient chemical incompatibilities and, if possible, for modified release. Fast-hydrating dry granulates which swell into pudding-like vehicles have been developed as carriers for the microencapsulated drugs. Robots can accurately dispense the prescribed drugs into appropriate packages, but US and EU registration procedures so far could not handle drug registration within the framework of automated compounding. This might be the challenge of coming years and decades.

The technical challenges in producing the components are examined, analysis procedures evaluated and the regulatory aspects are tentatively discussed.

Keywords

  • Pore Density
  • Small Pore Diameter
  • Automate Dispense
  • Taste Pore
  • Secondary Packaging

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Daniel Bar-Shalom .

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© 2014 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

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Bar-Shalom, D. (2014). The Challenge of Automated Compounding. In: Bar-Shalom, D., Rose, K. (eds) Pediatric Formulations. AAPS Advances in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Series, vol 11. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-8011-3_13

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