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Karachay Ayran: From Domestic Technology to Industrial Production

  • I. K. Kulikova
  • S. E. Vinogradskaya
  • O. I. Oleshkevich
  • L. R. Alieva
  • Anna McElhatton
Chapter
Part of the Integrating Food Science and Engineering Knowledge Into the Food Chain book series (ISEKI-Food, volume 11)

Abstract

Karachay Ayran is a product of mixed fermentation that contains low levels of alcohol and carbon dioxide. Karachay Ayran has been reported to have antimicrobial, anticancer, and other health promoting properties.

Domestic and industrial Ayran production processes differ significantly, in both the processes applied and the composition of the microflora starters used. Three types of bacteria are known to be active in Karachay Ayran production, namely the thermophilic (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus), mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis biovar. diacetilactis), and yeasts.

The industrial technology in current use consists of two stages, fermentation at (35–45) °C caused by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria and ripening at 4–8 °C caused by yeast.

To provide the appropriate growth conditions for all Karachay Ayran microflora the three temperature intervals used in the process should correspond to the optimum growth temperatures of the microorganisms involved. In this case Ayran produced industrially has the typical organoleptic and physicochemical profiles of traditional Karachay Ayran.

Keywords

Ayran Fermented milk Caucasus Cattle 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. K. Kulikova
    • 1
  • S. E. Vinogradskaya
    • 1
  • O. I. Oleshkevich
    • 1
  • L. R. Alieva
    • 1
  • Anna McElhatton
    • 2
  1. 1.FSAEI HPE, North-Caucasus Federal UniversityStavropolRussia
  2. 2.Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of MaltaMsidaMalta

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