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Problem-Solving Consultation

  • William P. ErchulEmail author
  • Caryn S. Ward
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, focus is on the intersection of problem solving, consultation, and response to intervention (RTI). After briefly defining each term,consultation and RTI are explored in depth, and a similarities/differences comparison is presented. Although there are some clear similarities that exist within the fields of school consultation and RTI (e.g., importance placed on the problem-solving process, prevention efforts, evidence-based practices, intervention implementation with high fidelity), the differences between the two fields outnumber these similarities (Erchul, J Educ Psychol Consult 21:191–208, 2011). The authors conclude that, although problem-solving consultation methods undergird many RTI practices, the established consultation literature could contribute much more to the science and practice of RTI. The chapter concludes with suggestions for further research and implications for enhancing practice.

Keywords

African American Student Universal Screening Progress Monitoring Improve Student Achievement Functional Behavior Assessment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Arizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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