Childhood and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders

  • Ronald A. Kleinknecht

Abstract

Like adults, children experience anxiety intensely and frequently enough to qualify for all the anxiety-disorder diagnoses. In many cases, the form of the anxiety disorder is identical or highly similar to that seen in adults. However, there are some differences that need to be taken into account. For example, children’s avoidance behaviors may be somewhat different from that of adults because of their lesser mobility. Parents often force children to go places where they do not want to go; they have fewer choices.

Keywords

Depression Diarrhea Posite Stein Alan 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald A. Kleinknecht
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Washington UniversityBellinghamUSA

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