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Functional Is Not Enough: Training Conversation Partners for Aphasic Adults

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Abstract

Visit with us at a local community center program. Nothing particularly dramatic is occurring — just small groups of four or five people sitting around tables, chatting. Most participants are seniors; some are in wheelchairs. One of the group members seems to be doing more of the talking and, at times, there are longer periods of silence than you might expect. Laughter emanates from many of the groups, while others seem involved in serious discussion. You see newspapers on the tables, along with blank cards, paper, pencils, and markers. Photographs, maps, magnetic alphabet boards, and calendars are easily accessible to all.

Keywords

  • Functional Communication
  • Conversation Partner
  • Psychosocial Benefit
  • Natural Conversation
  • World Perspective

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Kagan, A., Gailey, G.F. (1993). Functional Is Not Enough: Training Conversation Partners for Aphasic Adults. In: Holland, A.L., Forbes, M.M. (eds) Aphasia Treatment. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-7248-4_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-7248-4_9

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-0-412-57210-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4899-7248-4

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