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Eukaryotic microorganisms

  • Trevor Gross
  • Jane Faull
  • Steve Ketteridge
  • Derek Springham

Abstract

In this chapter we will consider the structure, growth and reproduction of eukaryotic microorganisms. The features that they share will be emphasized, and we will discover the ways in which they have solved the environmental problems that affect them. In spite of their small size and relative simplicity, eukaryotic microorganisms are very important to man. They include the algae, the organisms responsible for the greatest proportion of primary productivity in the oceans, the protozoa, organisms responsible for diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis, and the fungi, the organisms responsible for the breakdown and recycling of carbon on a global scale.

Keywords

Sexual Reproduction Daughter Cell Mating Type Asexual Reproduction Slime Mould 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further reading

  1. C.T. Ingold and H.J. Hudson (1993) The Biology of Fungi. 6th Edition. Chapman & Hall, London — an excellent introductory text for anyone wishing to learn more about the fungi. It covers their morphology and reproduction in detail, and gives detailed consideration of their importance in the ecosystems they inhabit.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. M. Sleigh (1991) Protozoa and Other Protists. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge — This book covers both the protozoa and the protistan algae to some depth. As well as details of structure and function, the author gives some thought to the similarities between members of the two groups.Google Scholar
  3. S. Isaacs (1992) Fungal—Plant Interactions. Chapman & Hall, London — the ecology of the fungi on plants is considered in this book, from parasites to symbionts. An excellent book for environmental scientists.Google Scholar
  4. R.E. Lee (1989) Phycology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge — this book covers the algae extensively, including morphology, physiology and ecology of all the major groups. It provides interesting details of famous phycologists too.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Trevor Gross, Jane Faull, Steve Ketteridge and Derek Springham 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Trevor Gross
    • 1
  • Jane Faull
    • 2
  • Steve Ketteridge
    • 3
  • Derek Springham
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesThe Manchester Metropolitan UniversityManchesterUK
  2. 2.Department of Biology, Birkbeck CollegeUniversity of LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Queen Mary and Westfield CollegeUniversity of LondonLondonUK

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