Diet and Disease

  • C. R. Pennington

Abstract

The food we eat can promote ill health in various ways. Inadequate nutrient intake will invariably lead to malnutrition and a poorly balanced diet is associated with a spectrum of disorders including intestinal and degenerative vascular disease. Food may be contaminated by micro-organisms and chemicals, and allergic or non-allergic reactions to specific food components may effect some patients. Malnutrition and methods of nutritional support, and the role of nutrition in genesis and management of disease have been discussed in earlier chapters. This chapter reviews the subject of food poisoning and food intolerance. It also includes a summary of therapeutic dietetics and outlines the principal diets in current use.

Keywords

Sugar Sewage Turkey Sponge Smoke 

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References

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Copyright information

© C. R. Pennington 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. R. Pennington
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s Cross HospitalDundeeScotland

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