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Nursing models

  • Pauline Jeffree

Abstract

The term ‘model’ applies to a set of concepts. A nursing model is based on a model of living. Most members of the public only require nursing intervention episodically during their lives and the original rationale of linking nursing with living is that there should be minimal interruption of a patient/client’s usual way of life when nursing intervention was needed. Nearly all such models owe at least part of their theory to the work of Maslow (page 35).

Keywords

Nurse Practice Energy Field Nursing Intervention Behavioural System Original Rationale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Further Reading

The Roper, Logan and Tierney model

  1. Aggleton, P. and Chalmers, H. (1986) Nursing Models and the Nursing Process. Macmillan Education.Google Scholar
  2. Chapman, C.M. (1985) Theory of Nursing: Practical Application. Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  3. Kersham, B. and Salvage, J. (1986) Models for Nursing. John Wiley.Google Scholar
  4. The Open University (1984) A Systematic Approach to Nursing Care, Module 1.Google Scholar
  5. Roper, N., Logan, W.W. and Tierney, A.J. (1980) The Elements of Nursing, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  6. Roper, N., Logan, W.W. and Tierney, A.J. (1982) Learning to Use the Process of Nursing. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  7. Roper, N., Logan, W.W. and Tierney, A.J. (1985) The Elements of Nursing. 2nd edn. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.Google Scholar

The Roy adaptation model

  1. Andrews, H.A. and Roy, C. (1986) Essentials of the Roy Adaptation Model. Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Helson, H. (1964) Adaptation Level Theory. Harper and Row, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Randell, B., Tedrow, M. and Van Landingham, J. (1982) The Roy Conceptual Model Made Practical. C. V. Mosby, St Louis.Google Scholar
  4. Riehl, J.P. and Roy, C. (1977) Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice. AppletonCentury-Crofts, New York.Google Scholar
  5. Riehl, J.P. and Roy, C. (1980) Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice. 2nd edn. Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York.Google Scholar
  6. Roy, C. (1976) Introduction to Nursing: An Adaptation Model. Prentice Hall, Englewood, Cliffs, NJ.Google Scholar

The Orem model of self-care

  1. Chinn, P.L. (1983) Advances in Nursing Theory Development. Aspen, Gaithersburg, MD.Google Scholar
  2. Jeffree, P. (1990) The Practice Nurse — Theory and Practice. Chapman Hall, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Orem, D. (1971) Nursing: Concepts of Practice. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Orem, D. (1980) Nursing: Concepts of Practice. 2nd edn. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  5. Orem, D. (1985) Nursing: Concepts of Practice. 3rd edn. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar

Johnson’s behavioural systems model

  1. Johnson, D.E. (1968) Theory in nursing: borrowed and unique. Nursing Research 17: 206–209.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Johnson, E.D. (1980) The behavioural systems model for nursing. In Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice (eds J.P. Riehl, and C. Roy). 2nd edn. AppletonCentury-Crofts, New York.Google Scholar

Rogers’ model

  1. Rogers, M.E. (1970) An Introduction to the Theoretical Basis of Nursing. F.A. Davis, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  2. Rogers, M.E. (1980) A science of unitary man. In Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice (eds J.P. Riehl and C. Roy). 2nd edn. Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Rogers, M.E. (1983) Science of unitary human beings: a paradigm for nursing. In Family Health: A Theoretical Approach to Nursing Care (eds I.W. Clements and F.B. Roberts ). John Wiley, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Pauline Jeffree 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pauline Jeffree
    • 1
  1. 1.Elm House SurgeryBeckenhamUK

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