Management of vascular injuries

  • M. O. Perry

Abstract

Although major vascular injuries can be encountered in any civilian setting, the highest incidence is in urban areas where violence is endemic. Penetrating wounds caused by knives and bullets are usually seen, but accidental stab wounds caused by shards of glass or metal also occur. The damage produced by knives or bullets travelling at a low velocity is mainly confined to the wound tract, but high-velocity bullets are associated with blast injury. As the blast cavity collapses, a suction effect is generated which can draw skin, dirt and bits of clothing into the wound. Secondary missiles (bullet fragments or bone splinters) can produce further damage. Such destructive effects may not be suspected from inspection of the skin where, in some cases, rather small wounds are present1,2.

Keywords

Catheter Aspirin Heparin Sponge PTFE 

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References

  1. 1.
    Perry MO. The Management of Acute Vascular Injuries. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1981.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rich NM, Spencer FC. Vascular Trauma. Philadelphia: WB Saunders, 1978.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Thal ER, Snyder WH, Hays RJ, Perry MO. Management of carotid artery injuries. Surgery 1974; 76: 955–62.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Perry MO. Metabolic response to trauma. In: Schwartz SI, ed. Principles of Surgery, 3rd edn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1979: 223–6.Google Scholar
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    Snyder WH, Thai ER, Perry MO. Vascular injuries of the extremities. In: Rutherford RB, ed. Vascular Surgery, 3rd edn. Philadelphia: WB Saunders, 1989: 613–37.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. O. Perry
    • 1
  1. 1.Texas Tech University Health Sciences CenterLubbockUSA

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