Neuropsychological Approaches to the Remediation of Educational Deficits

  • Phyllis Anne Teeter
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The primary purpose of this chapter is to introduce neuropsychological principles and approaches related to the remediation of brain-related educational deficits. General theories of how the brain functions following damage or dysfunction will be discussed in terms of prediction and outcome expectations, including: neurodevelopmental factors that affect recovery of functions; how the severity of deficits affects remediation; and the impact of associated medical and psychological deficits on remediation. A review of several neuropsychological remediation programs will be presented, including Reitan’s REHABIT Program and Kaufman’s Sequential or Simultaneous Program. Finally, specific remedial techniques for treating brain-related deficits in reading, math, spelling, and reasoning will be discussed. Although this chapter will provide a theoretical basis for neuropsychological remediation, readers are cautioned that there are still many questions to be answered because so few remedial approaches for specific brain-related deficits have been empirically tested.

Keywords

Placebo Clay Depression Folic Acid Trench 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phyllis Anne Teeter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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