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Applications of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC) in Neuropsychological Assessment

  • Cecil R. Reynolds
  • Randy W. Kamphaus
  • Becky L. Rosenthal
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC) (Kaufman & Kaufman, 1983a) is a recently published, individually administered clinical test of intelligence and achievement designed specifically for use with children from 24 to 124 years of age. The K-ABC was developed from a theoretical framework that to a large degree reflects a coalescence of the work of Luria and Vygotsky and American researchers with interests in cerebral specialization as interpreted and integrated by Alan and Nadeen Kaufman. The K-ABC is thus of interest to clinical neuropsychologists. This chapter will review the theoretical framework of the K-ABC, provide an overview of the test, its methods of development and standardization, its technical properties, and describe its conceptual and empirical relationship to neuropsychology. Additionally, techniques for rehabilitation of academic disturbances will be introduced as viewed from the K-ABC model.

Keywords

Neuropsychological Assessment Mental Processing Right Hemisphere Simultaneous Processing Hemispheric Specialization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cecil R. Reynolds
    • 1
  • Randy W. Kamphaus
    • 2
  • Becky L. Rosenthal
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyTexas A&M University, College StationTexasUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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