Effects of Physiological Doses of Female Sex Hormones on the Mechanical and Electrical Behaviour of the Heart

  • E. L. de Beer
  • H. A. Keizer
  • P. Schiereck
  • C. van Amerongen

Abstract

The effect of physical exercise on female sex hormone metabolism has recently been studied (1, 2, 3). It was found that the plasma concentrations of estradiol and progesterone rapidly increased during exercise. It was recently established (4, 5) that the heart can act as a target organ for these hormones via receptor sites within the cytosol. However, a fast reaction of the heart via a receptor mechanism seems to us unlikely since a protein synthesis would have to be involved. Therefore, we investigated the short term effects of these hormones, in the physiological range of concentrations, on the electrical and mechanical activity of isolated rat and rabbit hearts.

Keywords

Progesterone Androgen Estradiol Cytosol Cardiol 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. L. de Beer
    • 1
  • H. A. Keizer
    • 1
  • P. Schiereck
    • 1
  • C. van Amerongen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical PhysiologyState University of UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

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