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Annelids and Learning: A Critical Review

  • Stanley C. Ratner

Abstract

The study of annelid learning appears to be moving from its second infancy. The brief flurry of work about fifty years ago seemed to establish clear evidence of annelid learning for a number of species. But the annelids and problems associated with interpretation of their learning were then retired into brief statements in general texts that alluded to “the facts.” The move from the second infancy of the study of annelid learning began after a long delay when investigators began applying more stringent definitions of learning and requiring more precise specification of conditions associated with learning. Thus, the literature on annelid learning now contains more than 50 references and the repertoire of an infant probably contains more than 50 units. But the problem is the degree of coherence and development of these units.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Unconditioned Stimulus Classical Conditioning Defensive Response Goal Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley C. Ratner
    • 1
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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