Coordination In Biochemistry: Reactions of Chromium (III)

  • C. L. Rollinson
  • E. W. Rosenbloom

Abstract

The fundamental nature of A. Werner’s theoretical concepts, which have been so effectively taught, extended and applied by Bailar, is demonstrated by their great power of correlating and accounting for chemical phenomena in diverse specific areas including the biochemistry of the essential metallic elements, one of which is chromium. In the first part of this communication, we will discuss briefly the general subject and in the second we will describe in some detail our investigations of the coordination chemistry of chromium(III) in reaction mixtures at physiological pH.

Keywords

Urea Cobalt Respiration Vanadium Molybdenum 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. L. Rollinson
    • 1
  • E. W. Rosenbloom
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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