What Goes On in Treatment?

  • H. Thomas MilhornJr.

Abstract

Once your child agrees to treatment, or is court-ordered to receive treatment, you must identify a program suitable for your particular adolescent. Generally, two options are available: inpatient treatment or outpatient treatment. Other less often used programs include half-way houses and therapeutic communities, known as residential treatment. The treatment professional is best qualified to advise you on which type of treatment is best suited for your child.

Keywords

Depression Cocaine Shoe Hate 

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References

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Copyright information

© H. Thomas Milhorn, Jr. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Thomas MilhornJr.

There are no affiliations available

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