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To Be a Victim pp 217-234 | Cite as

Computer Crime and Victim Justice

  • John T. Chu

Abstract

This chapter does not deal with computer crime per se. Its objective is to demonstrate, by an analysis of this type of crime, that the traditional approach to criminal law and justice is cumbersome and ineffective, and that new legislation could quickly become obsolete with the advancement of science and technology. Furthermore, if victim justice is given more careful consideration and emphasis, the legal system should improve significantly. The time is ripe for more systematic and scientific approaches to criminal and tort laws so that existing laws can be simplified and made more effective while reducing the need for new laws to include technological changes. General discussions of ways to improve the legal system can be found in Chapter 8 of this book. This chapter is an application of similar ideas to a specific area. General information on computer crime is available in the articles and books cited in the chapter reference list.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Legal System White Collar Crime Software Piracy Debit Card 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John T. Chu

There are no affiliations available

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