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An Arc Imaging Furnace for Solid Propellant Ignition Studies

  • Gerald E. Dolan
Conference paper

Abstract

The arc imaging furnace has proven to be a versatile instrument for studying solid propellant ignition. The features which make this instrument attractive are: (1) reproducible flux levels, (2) clean source of heat, and (3) what may be termed ‘instant’ heat, i.e., the high blackbody temperatures may be turned on and off instantly without any appreciable heat losses, which for other high-temperature devices constitute a significant source of error.

Keywords

Solid Propellant Rocket Motor Flame Zone Composite Solid Propellant Motor Data 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Grande, Cecilio, “New Methods for the Measurement of Relative Ignitability and Ignition Deficiency,” Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, New Jersey, Samuel Feltman Ammunition Laboratory. Ordnance Project No. TA1–502, Army Project No. 5804–01-040 (February, 1958).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    McAlevy, Robert F., and Summerfield, Martin, “The Ignition Mechanism of Composite Solid Propellant”, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (June 1, 1961).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Byers, Rodney E., and Fishman, Norman, “Solid Propellant Ignition Studies with High-Flux Radiant Energy as a Thermal Source,” Progress in Astronautics and Rocketry, Vol. 1 (Academic Press, New York, 1960), p. 673.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lowry, E.M., and Asphend, R. K., “Solid Propellant Ignition Studies Using the Arc-Image Apparatus under Dynamic Conditions,” Bermite Powder Company, Saugus, California (November 27, 1961), (Confidential).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sienicki, E. A., et al. “A Study of Methods of Improving the Shelf Life of Solid Propellant Rocket Engines,” Report No. E 115–61, Volumes I and II, Thiokol Chemical Corporation, Elkton Division, Elkton, Maryland (May 1961), (Confidential).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald E. Dolan
    • 1
  1. 1.Thiokol Chemical CorporationElkton DivisionElktonUSA

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