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Qualitative approaches

  • Janice M. Morse
  • Peggy Anne Field

Abstract

In this chapter selected qualitative methods introduced in Chapter 2 will be discussed in greater depth. These methods include phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography and ethnoscience. Issues in conducting qualitative research will then be examined, such as rigour, reliability and validity, Finally, techniques of triangulation will be described and methods of synthesizing qualitative studies will be presented.

Keywords

Ground Theory Card Sort Core Category Difficult Patient Sentence Frame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Janice M. Morse and Peggy Anne Field 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janice M. Morse
    • 1
  • Peggy Anne Field
    • 2
  1. 1.School of NursingPennsylvania State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of NursingUniversity of AlbertaCanada

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