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An overview of qualitative methods

  • Janice M. Morse
  • Peggy Anne Field

Abstract

In the previous chapter, the rationale for a qualitative approach for research was presented. In this chapter, some of the methods that may be used to examine phenomena qualitatively will be introduced, and then factors to consider when selecting a qualitative method will be discussed.

Keywords

Focus Group Qualitative Research Historical Research Qualitative Research Method Symbolic Interactionism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Janice M. Morse and Peggy Anne Field 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janice M. Morse
    • 1
  • Peggy Anne Field
    • 2
  1. 1.School of NursingPennsylvania State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of NursingUniversity of AlbertaCanada

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