Speciation in Living Hominoid Primates

  • Colin P. Groves
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (AIPR)

Abstract

The most widely discussed review of models of speciation in animals (White, 1978) lists seven possible modes:
  1. 1.

    Gradual divergence of two large populations after their geographic isolation

     
  2. 2.

    The founder principle

     
  3. 3.

    De facto differentiation of two races following extinction of the geographic intermediates

     
  4. 4.

    Local steepening of a cline

     
  5. 5.

    Selection against hybridization of strongly differentiated local races (area effects)

     
  6. 6.

    Stasipatric speciation: spread of chromosomal rearrangements aided by high levels of inbreeding

     
  7. 7.

    Sympatric speciation, in the strict sense, by assortative mating

     

Keywords

Amid Electrophoresis Flare Expense Peri 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Andrews, P 1987 Aspects of hommoid phylogeny, in C. Patterson (ed.), Molecules and Morphology in Evolution Conflict or Compromise?, pp. 21–53. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Google Scholar
  2. Bodmer, R. E., Mather, R J. and Chivers, D J. 1991. Rain forests of central Borneo-threatened by modern development. Oryx 25:21–26.Google Scholar
  3. Brockelman, W. Y. 1984. Social behavior of gibbons. Introduction, in: H. Preuschoft, D.J. Chivers, W. Y. Brockelman and N. Creel (eds.), The Lesser Apes, pp. 285–290, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  4. Brockelman, W Y., and Gittins, S P 1984. Natural hybridization in the Hylobates lar species group: implications for speciation in gibbons, in: H. Preuschoft, D. J. Chivers, W. Y. Brockelman, and N Creel (eds.), The Lesser Apes, pp 498–532. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  5. Brockelman, W. Y., and Srikosamatara, S. 1984. Maintenance and evolution of social structure in gibbons, in: H. Preuschoft, D.J Chivers, W. Y Brockelman, and N Creel (eds), The Lesser Apes, pp. 298–323. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  6. Brown, W. L. 1957. Centrifugal speciation Q. Rev Biol. 32:247–277.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Carpenter, C. R 1940. A field study in Siam of the behavior and social relations of the gibbon (Hylobates lar), Comp. Psychol Monogr 16:1–212Google Scholar
  8. Chivers, D.J. 1977. The lesser apes, in: HRH Ranier and G A. Bourne (eds), Primate Conservation, pp. 539–98 Academic Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  9. Couturier, J., and Lernould, J M 1991. Karyotypic study of four gibbon forms previously considered as subspecies of Hylobates (Nomascus) concolor (Primates, Pongidae, Hylobatidae) Folia Pri-matol. 56:95–104CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Courtney, J., Groves, C., and Andrews, P 1988 Inter- and intra-island variation? An assessment of the differences between Bornean and Sumatran Orang-utans, in: J. H. Schwartz (ed.), Orangutan Biology, pp. 19–29, Oxford University Press, New York.Google Scholar
  11. Creel, N, and Preuschoft, H. 1984 Pathways of speciation: an introduction in: H. Preuschoft, D.J. Chivers, W. Y. Brockelman, and N. Creel (eds.), The Lesser Apes, pp. 427–430. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  12. Cronin, J. E., Sarich, V. M., and Ryder, O. 1984. Molecular evolution and speciation in the lesser apes, in. H Preuschoft, D. J. Chivers, W. Y Brockelman, and N. Creel (eds.), The Lesser Apes, pp. 467–485 Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  13. Dao, V. T. 1983. On the north Indochinese gibbons (Hylobates concolor)(Pnmates: Hylobatidae) in North Vietnam, J Hum. Evol 12:367–72CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Diamond, J. M. 1988. DNA-based phylogemes of the three chimpanzees. Nature 332:6856.Google Scholar
  15. Fooden, J. 1969. Color phase in gibbons. Evolution 23:627–644CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Geissmann, T. 1984. Inheritance of song parameters in the gibbon song, analysed in 2 hybrid gibbons (Hylobates pileatus x H lar) Folia Primatol 42:216–235CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Gittens, S. P. 1984 Territorial advertisement and defence in gibbons, in. H. Prenschaft, D. J. Chivers, W. Y. Brockelman, and N. Creel (eds), The Lesser Apes, pp. 420–424. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  18. Groves, C. P. 1972. Systematics and phylogeny of gibbons, in: D. M. Rumbaugh (ed.), Gibbon and Siamang, Vol. 1, pp. 1–89. S. Karger, Basel.Google Scholar
  19. Groves, C. P. 1984. A new look at the taxonomy and phylogeny of the gibbons, in: H. Preuschoft, D.J. Chivers, W. Y. Brockelman, and N. Creel (eds.), The Lesser Apes, pp. 542–561. Edinburgh University Press, EdinburghGoogle Scholar
  20. Groves, C P. 1986. Systematics of the Great Apes, in: D R. Swindler and J Erwin (eds.), Comparative Primate Biology. 1. Systematics, Evolution and Anatomy, pp. 187–217, Alan R. Liss, New York.Google Scholar
  21. Groves, C. P. 1989. A Theory of Human and Primate Evolution Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  22. Groves, C. P., and Wang Y. 1990. The gibbons of the subgenus Nomascus (Primates, Mammalia). Zool Res 11:147–154Google Scholar
  23. Groves, C. P., Westwood, C., and Shea, B. T 1992. Unfinished business: Mahalanobis and a clockwork orang. J Hum Evol 22:327–340CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Haimoff, E H., Gittins, S. P., Whitten, A. J., and Chivers, D J. 1984 A phylogeny and classification of gibbons based on morphology and ethology, in: H. Prenschaft, D. J. Chivers, W. Y. Brockelman, and N. Creel (eds.), The Lesser Apes, pp. 614–632. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  25. Hasegawa, M, and Horai S. 1991. Time of the deepest root for polymorphism in human mitochondrial DNA. J. Mol Evol. 32:37–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Janczewski, D. N., Goldman, D., and O’Brien, S J 1990. Molecular genetic divergence of Orang Utan (Pongo pygmaeus) subspecies based on isozyme and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. J. Hered. 81:375–387PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Ma S., and Wang Y. 1986. The taxonomy and distribution of the gibbons in southern China and its adjacent region, with description of three new subspecies. Zool. Res 7:393–410.Google Scholar
  28. Marshall, J., and Sugardjito, J. 1986 Gibbon systematics, in: J. Erwin and D R. Swindler (eds.), Comparative Primate Biology, 1 Systematics, Evolution and Anatomy, pp. 137–185. Alan R. Liss, New York.Google Scholar
  29. Marshall, J. T., Sugardjito, J., and Markaya, M. 1984 Gibbons of the Lar Group: relationship based on voice, in: H. Preuschoft, D.J. Chivers, W Y. Brockelman, and N. Creel (eds.), The Lesser Apes, pp. 533–541. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  30. Mitani, J. C. 1987a. Territoriality and monogamy among agile gibbons (Hylobates agihs). Behav. Ecol. Sociobol 20:265–269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Mitani, J. C. 1987b. Species discrimination of male song in gibbons. Am. J. Primatol. 13:413–423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Ruvolo, M., Disotell, T. R., Allard, M. W., Brown, W. M., and Honeycutt, R L. 1991. Resolution of the African hominoid trichotomy by use of mitochondrial gene sequence. Proc. Natl. Acad Sci USA 88:1570–1574.PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Srikosamatara, S., and Brockelman, W. Y. 1987 Polygyny in a group of pileated gibbons via a familial route. Int. J. Primatol. 8:389–393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Stanyon, R., Chiarelli, B., Gottlieb, K., and Patton, W. H. 1986. The phylogenetic and taxonomic status of Pan paniscus a chromosomal perspective. Am. J Phys Anthrop 69:489–498.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. White, M.J. D. 1978. Modes of Speciation. W. H. Freeman, San Francisco.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin P. Groves
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Archaeology and AnthropologyAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

Personalised recommendations