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Evaluating the Built Environment from the Users’ Point of View: An Attitudinal Model of Residential Satisfaction

  • Guido Francescato
  • Sue Weidemann
  • James R. Anderson

Abstract

The literature in the evaluation of built environments has had a tendency to be long on techniques and on examples of applications but short on theory. This is not surprising, as evaluation is a practical activity concerned mainly with the performance of existing environments in use. Its aim is primarily that of providing information which can be applied to improve unsatisfactory environments. Within this limited scope, theory would appear at first glance to be of little relevance, just as it is not important for the driver of an automobile to be conversant with the theory of internal combustion engines or that of aerodynamics in order to drive safely and successfully.

Keywords

Behavioral Intention External Variable Environmental Evaluation Attitude Model Attitude Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guido Francescato
    • 1
  • Sue Weidemann
    • 2
  • James R. Anderson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Housing and DesignUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.School of ArchitectureUniversity of IllinoisUrbana-ChampaignUSA

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