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Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Coals, Cokes, and Coal-Derived Liquids

  • B. C. Gerstein
  • M. Pruski
  • Dieter Michel
Part of the Modern Analytical Chemistry book series (MOAC)

Abstract

Although classical chemical methods and some modern techniques (e.g., high performance liquid chromatography, thermogravimetry, mass spectroscopy) have proved very useful in characterizing liquid products and extracts of coals, no determination of the chemical and physical structure of parent coals and solid products of coal processing was usually possible by employing those methods. This has stimulated the development of other, nondestructive spectroscopic techniques suitable for analyzing whole coals as well as solid (and liquid) products of fossil fuel processing. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been one of the most powerful resonance spectroscopies for identifying both microscopic and, in the case of imaging, macroscopic regions of matter.(1–5) It is with pulse and Fourier transform techniques in 1H NMR(6) that the present chapter will deal. The reasons NMR has been traditionally such a powerful tool are easy to understand. First, and quite importantly, for spin-1/2 nuclei such as are protons, the NMR signal may generally be used for quantitative analysis. This statement is critical because hydrogen is the most sensitive nucleus commonly detected by NMR, but one of the least sensitive when analyzed by chemical methods such as combustion analyses of hydrocarbons. This statement is especially true for ill-characterized, heterogeneous hydrocarbons such as coals and pitches.

Keywords

Brown Coal Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Solid Fossil Fuel Single Pulse Excitation North Dakota Lignite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. C. Gerstein
    • 1
  • M. Pruski
    • 1
  • Dieter Michel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and Ames LaboratoryIowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  2. 2.Sektion PhysikKarl-Marx-UniversitätLeipzigGermany

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