Advertisement

Molecular Characterization and Genome Manipulation of the Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

  • Julian M. Crampton
  • Alison Morris
  • Gareth Lycett
  • Ann Warren
  • Paul Eggleston

Abstract

Diseases transmitted by insects, and particularly by mosquitoes, remain some of the most important health problems in the world today. Malaria, transmitted by Anopheline mosquitoes affects approximately 489 million children per year (Stürcher, 1989). Aedes aegypti is the major urban vector of the arboviruses including yellow fever, dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). These acute diseases also affect millions of people and cause many fatalities. Urban epidemics occur frequently, making DHF a major cause of hospitalization and death of children in many Asian countries (Rudnick, 1967).

Keywords

Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Inverted Terminal Repeat rDNA Repeat Heat Shock Promoter Culture Mosquito Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Black, W. C. and Rai, K. S. 1988. Genome evolution in mosquitoes: Intraspecific and interspecific variation in repetitive RNA amounts and organization. Genet. Res. Camb. 51: 185–195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Boeke, J. D., Xu, H. and Fink, G. R. 1988. A general method for the chromosomal amplification of genes in yeast. Science 239: 280–282.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brennan, M.D., Rowan, R. G. and Dickinson, W. J. 1984. Introduction of a functional P element into the germ line of Drosophila hawaiiensis. Cell 38: 147–151.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Britten, R. J., Graham, D. E., Eden, F. C., Painchaud, D. M. and Davidson, E. N. 1976. Analysis of repeating DNA sequences by reassociation. J. Mol. Evol. 9: 1–23.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Brown, A. M. C. and Scott, M. R. D. 1987. pp 109–212 in: “DNA Cloning — A Practical Approach.” Vol. III. Glover, D.M., ed. IRL Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  6. Chada, K., Magram, J., Raphael, K., Radice, G., Lacy, E. and Constantini, F. 1985. Specific expression of a foreign γ-globin gene in erythroid cells of transgenic mice. Nature 314: 377–380.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Chu, G., Hayakawa, H. and Berg, P. 1987. Electroporation for the efficient transfection of mammalian cells with DNA. Nucl. Acid. Res. 15: 1311–1326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Daniels, S. B., Strausbaugh, L. D. and Armstrong, R. A. 1985. Molecular analysis of P element behavior in Drosophila simulans. Mol. Gen. Genet. 200: 258–265.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Durbin, J. E. and Fallon, A. M. 1985. Transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene in cultured mosquito cells. Gene 36: 173–178.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Feigner, P. L., Gadek, T. R., Holm, M., Roman, R., Chan, H. W., Wenz, M., Northrop, J. P., Ringhold, G. M. and Danielson, M. 1987. Lipofection: a highly efficient, lipid mediated DNA transfection procedure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 84: 7413–7417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Freshney, R. 1986. Introduction: Principles of sterile technique and cell propagation. pp 1–11 in: “Animal Cell Culture: A Practical Approach.” IRL Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  12. Gale, K. and Crampton, J. M. 1989. The ribosomal genes of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, Eur. J. Biochem. 185: 311–317.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Green, S., Field, J. K., Green, C. D. and Beynon, R. J. 1982. A microcomputer program for analysis of nucleic acid hybridisation data. Nucl. Acid. Res. 10: 1411–1421.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Jacobs, E., Dewerchin, M. and Boeke, J. D. 1988. Retrovirus-like vectors for Saccharo- myces cerevisiae: Integration of foreign genes controlled by efficient promoters into yeast chromosomal DNA. Gene 67: 259–269.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Knipling, E. F., Laeven, H., Craig, G. B., Pal, R., Kitzmiller, J. B., Smith, C. N. and Brown, A. W. A. 1968. Genetic control of insects of public health importance. Bull. WHO. 38: 421–438.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Lopata, M. A., Cleveland, D. W. and Sollner-Webb, B. 1984. High level transient expression of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene by DEAE-dextran mediated DNA transfection coupled with a dimethyl sulfoxide or glycerol shock treatment. Nucl. Acid. Res. 12: 5707–5717.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. McGrane, V., Carlson, J. O., Miller, B. R. and Beatty, B. J. 1988. Microinjection of DNA into Aedes triseriatus ova and detection of integration. Amer. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 39: 502–510.Google Scholar
  18. Miller, L. H., Sakai, R. K., Romans, P., Gwadz, R. W., Kantoff, P. and Caon, H. G. 1987. Stable integration and expression of a bacterial gene in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Science 237: 779–781.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Morris, A. C., Eggleston, P. and Crampton, J. M. 1989. Genetic transformation of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti by micro-injection of DNA. Med. Vet. Ent. 3: 1–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. O’Brochta, D. A. and Handler, A. M. 1988. Mobility of P elements in drosophilids and non drosophillids. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85: 6052–6056.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Potter, S. S., Brorien, W. J., Dunsmuir, P. and Rubin, G. M. 1979. Transposition of elements of the 412, copia and 297 dispersed repeated gene families in Drosophila. Cell 17: 429–439.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Spradling, A. C. and Rubin, G. M. 1982. Transposition of cloned P elements into Drosophila germ line chromosomes. Science 218: 341–347.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Stürchler, D. 1989. How much malaria is there worldwide? Parasitol. Today 5: 39–40.Google Scholar
  24. Steiler, H. and Pirrotta, V. 1985. Transposable P vector that confers selectable G418 esistance to Drosophila larvae. EMBO J. 4: 167–171.Google Scholar
  25. Wigler, M., Siverstein, S., Lee, L. S., Pellicer, A., Cheng, Y. and Axel, R. 1977. Transfer f purified Herpes virus thymidine kinase gene to cultured mouse cells. Cell 11: 223–232.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian M. Crampton
    • 1
  • Alison Morris
    • 1
  • Gareth Lycett
    • 1
  • Ann Warren
    • 1
  • Paul Eggleston
    • 1
  1. 1.Wolfson Unit of Molecular GeneticsLiverpool School of Tropical MedicineLiverpoolUK

Personalised recommendations