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Measurement of Submicrometer Particle Deposition on Silicon Wafers in Cleanroom Environment

  • Ahmed A. Busnaina
  • Camilla M. Saviz

Abstract

The rate of deposition of submicrometer particles from a particle source onto a silicon wafer in a VLF cleanroom is investigated. Particle diameters ranging from 0.32 to 0.99 μm were studied. The effect of wafer surface voltage, time of exposure and particle concentration are also considered. High surface voltage resulted in greatly increased particle deposition rates. The minimum particle deposition rate was observed to be at 0.8 μm. For particles with d < 0.5μm, specifically 0.32μm particles, Brownian motion and electrostatic attraction forces were found to have a substantial effect on particle deposition. The measured deposition rate from a particle source above a wafer presented in this paper resemble realistic situations in many cleanrooms.

Keywords

Deposition Rate Silicon Wafer Particle Deposition Deposition Velocity Wafer Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ahmed A. Busnaina
    • 1
  • Camilla M. Saviz
    • 1
  1. 1.Microcontamination Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical EngineeringClarkson UniversityPotsdamUSA

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